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Secondary Sources in Legal Research: Review Questions

Encyclopedias. Treatises, Periodicals, Restatement, American Law Reports and other secondary source material.

Review Questions

Review Questions

1. You are a new associate in a small general practice law firm.  One of the senior partners, while passing you in the hall, states that a new client is stopping by in a few minutes and wants to know if the local public library can restrict public computer use to machines with filtering software.  He suggests you look AmJur.  Will you begin with AmJur?  If so, why?  If not, why not?

2. You have a robust criminal law practice.  You have seen references to a treatise on Criminal Procedure by LaFave, Israel and King.  What information is important in deciding whether or not you will purchase this set for your library?

3. List two methods of locating a treatise containing a discussion of ground water?

4. John F. O’Meara smoked cheap cigars, was missing the third finger on his left hand, and wrote a book called: Tort Liability of Illinois Land Occupiers.  Your boss would like to locate a copy.  It is not listed in the Washington University Law Library catalog.  What is your next step?

5. What is the difference between a bar journal and other periodicals.

6. Where can you find the full text of legal periodical articles online?

9. How is HeinOnline distinct from LegalTrac and the Index to Legal Periodicals?

10. The two national encyclopedias often refer you to state statutes? T/F

13. Westlaw and Lexis include all legal periodical articles from the twentieth and twenty-first century in their database systems.  T/F